Utah House

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    USUBC Location

    920 S 50 W, Kaysville, Utah

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    Utah House

    Visiting the Utah House

    Address

    920 South 50 West
    P.O. Box 265
    Kaysville, UT 84037

    Telephone: (801) 544-3089
    Fax: (801) 546-1699

    Hours

    Monday - Friday: 1-5 p.m.
    Saturday - Sunday: Closed

    Suggested Donation

    Utah House is open to the public for walk-in visitation, $2.00 suggested donation.

    Directions to the Utah House

    The Utah House demonstration and learning center is located at the Utah Botanical Center in Kaysville, Utah, just off Interstate 15.

    • From I-15 take the Kaysville exit #328.
    • Go east approximately 0.5 miles to the traffic light at Main Street .
    • Turn south (right) and drive 0.6 miles to the traffic light at 350 South.
    • Turn west (right) and drive 0.2 miles to the stop sign at 50 West.
    • Turn south (left) and drive 0.5 miles to the Utah House parking lot entrance on the west side of the street.

    Group Tours

    Group tours by appointment Monday - Friday, 9-4 p.m. Please call 801-544-3089 to schedule.

    (After hours tours can be scheduled for a minimum of 20 people.)

    Cost:

    • $2 per Individual
    • $1/Student.

    Features

    Sustainability

    The Utah House seeks to share the vision of preserving our natural resources for future generations. Efficient use of resources (energy,water, materials, land), minimization of waste, conservation of the natural environment, and creation of a healthy built environment are
    all part of sustainable design.

      

    Sustainability Features

    • Arbors are made of reclaimed timbers from the Great Salt Lake,
      reducing the need to harvest new wood.
    • Home compost bins use yard and kitchen waste to enrich garden
      soil and help ease pressure on municipal landfills and incinerators.
    • Mulching around plants reduces use of fertilizer products, herbicides
      and helps retain moisture.
    • Well adapted plants were selected, which don't require fertilizers and
      other additives in order to grow.

    Landscape

    The goal of the Utah House landscape is to raise awareness and educate the public about the value of home landscapes and their ability to conserve water and save energy. The Utah House water-wise landscape demonstrates how homeowners can create a beautiful and colorful landscape while significantly reducing water use. This innovative demonstration landscape uses up to 75% less water than a conventional landscape and showcases a variety of well-adapted and indigenous water-wise plants.

    View Photo Gallery

    Click here to view the Utah House plant list.

    Water

    The first step to the Utah House water-wise landscape was a plan and design, which considered the site and the landscape’s goals and objectives.

    A soil analysis was completed and organic matter was added to enhance drainage and moisture retention.

    Well-adapted, healthy plants were selected and grouped into hydrozones. Hydrozoning a landscape involves grouping plants together according to their water requirements.

    Practical turf areas of manageable sizes and shapes were created in areas where they provided a functional benefit.  

    Trees and shrubs were strategically planted to reduce runoff and minimize erosion.

    Mulches were used in shrub and perennial beds. Mulches conserve soil moisture and increase soil nutrients.

    Irrigate efficiently – not excessively. The Utah House landscape uses a properly designed system that applies the right amount of water at the right time for each hydrozone. Guidance for proper lawn watering in Utah can be found at the Utah DEQ website.

    Gravel surfaces and concrete pavers were used, which allow storm water to penetrate into the soil.This reduces run-off and erosion and helps filter excessive nutrients. High nutrient loads from home fertilizer use can upset the balance in the storm water-fed ponds.

    The roof is used as a water collection agent. Rain water is stored in a rain barrel and used for irrigation purposes.

    Health

    The Utah House Raised Bed garden demonstrates how home gardeners can grow healthy fresh food that is rich in vitamins and minerals, and harvested at the freshest stage of maturity. The raised beds are also a demonstration of organic gardening. Organic gardening means we do not use synthetic fertilizers or pesticides on the plants. Organic gardening begins with healthy soil and at the Utah House we add compost and natural fertilizers to provide our plants with the necessary nutrition.


    Organic pest control involves many of the following:

    • Allowing for an acceptable level of pest damage
    • Encouraging predatory or beneficial insects
    • Careful plant selection, choosing well adapted disease-resistant varieties
    • Planting companion plants that discourage insects
    • Rotating crops from year to year to interrupt pest reproduction cycles

    Accessibility

    All first level entrances are level, smooth, and stable, which helps make the landscape's textured surfaces on driveways and walkways prevent slips.

    Main entry is covered, without steps or any type of impediment, spacious (36" wide), and has a lever for the door handle.

    A raised garden bed offers comfortable access to gardening for people with physical challenges.

    The raised beds are designed with the use of Gravel Pave, a porusring-and-grid structure that provides a low maintenance, reliable surface with excellent drainage, and accessibility for wheelchairs.

    History

    The Utah House (UH) project was developed from the grass roots out of concern for the environment. In 1996, Utah State University Extension sponsored a workshop and nearly 100 people attended to discuss the possibility of building a demonstration home in Utah. The idea of creating the UH prompted enough synergy to motivate over 50 people to work on teams to make the vision of the UH become a reality.  Volunteer teams were organized around marketing, education, fund raising, infrastructure, house design, and landscape design.  Out of the volunteers, the executive team was formed. They worked for a year on creating the name, vision, and principles of the UH. 

    Mission

    Our mission is to demonstrate, educate, and empower the public about new ways of building homes and creating landscapes that promote energy efficiency, water conservation, universal design principles, healthy indoor environments, and the sustainable use of all resources. Located at the Utah Botanical Center, the Utah House is open to the public for tours, workshops, youth groups, field trips, and event rental.

    Donations

    Why Donate

    Utah House project welcomes all types of gifts, including cash, sponsorships, and the donation of products, services, and/or supplies. To acknowledge your generosity and support, the Utah House team is happy to recognize you or your company in a variety of ways. As a partner, we offer you an assortment of advertising opportunities within the house and throughout marketing materials. This is just one way of expressing our appreciation. Check with our office for additional recognition activities, depending on levels of partnership.

    How To Donate

    You can make a gift to the Utah House in a number of ways:

    1. Make a check payable to Utah House Utah State University and mailed to:
      Jayne Mulford
      P.O. Box 265
      Kaysville, UT 84037

    2. For partnership opportunities or contributions of products, materials, services, and/or supplies please call Michael Dietz at (435) 797-3313.

    Levels of Partnership

    Donation

    Platinum

    $50,000

    Gold

    $25,000

    Silver

    $10,000

    Bronze

    $5,000

    Green

    Over five years totaling $5,000

    Utah House Friends

    $1,000

    Tax Deduction: All gifts are eligible for a charitable tax deduction on Federal income taxes.

    Rental Rates

    Facility to be Rented

    Time

    Monday-Thursday 

    Friday-Sunday 

    Capacity

    Wetland Discovery Point

    6 Hrs

    $750

    $850 (90 black chairs)

    250

    Utah House 

    6 Hrs

     $400

    $500 (40 green chairs)

    200

    UH Classroom Only 

    6 Hrs

     $100

    $150 (40 green chairs)

    50

    UH Classroom Business Hours

    4 Hrs

     $75

       

    Pavilion

    6 Hrs

     $175

    $200

     

    Rasmussen Teaching Garden 

    6 Hrs

     $175

    $200

     
    Discount: Garden members receive a 5% discount at Kaysville locations.
    • A non-refundable deposit of $150 is required at the time of the initial booking in order to hold your date. The deposit is subtracted from the total.
    • Additional hourly rental beyond allotted rental time is available for $50 per hour. 
    • USUBC facilities are available Monday through Sunday, but unavailable most holidays. 
    • Payment can be made by check, Discover, MasterCard, Visa and is due 30 days prior to your event. Payment after your event will result in an additional 10% late fee.

    Rental Fees Include: 

    • The use of the building and our garden space. 
    • Staff person onsite throughout your event. 
    • Use of audio/visual equipment associated with each facility. 

    Products Labor

    Want to install something you have seen in the Utah House in your own home? The links to the right will provide you contact information for individuals and companies who supplied products and labor to the Utah House project.

    Construction materials Mechanical systems Appliances, furnishings & fixtures Landscape Labor & design

    Mechanical Systems

     System

    Business

    Contact Name

    Phone

     
    Hot & cold water distribution Vanguard, Godwin & Shultz Bill Godwin 801-972-0659
      National Residential Sales Manager Dalyn Cantrell 800-774-5237 Ext. 126
    Boiler for heating water & air Q West Sales, Dunkirk Boiler Rudy Vanderniet 801-978-2212
    Solar Panel meters Atkinson Electronics Inc. Gaylen V. Atkinson 801 261-3600 Ext. 7950
    Solar Panel (PV) Uni-Solar & BP Solar Oran Farmsworth 801-501-9353
    Gas pipes Gastite Sales Kurt Folkersen  
    HVAC -Ground Source Heating & Cooling GSC Northwest, Lossnay HVAC Equipment Rick Giolas 801-288-1000
    Alarm System Mountain Alarm Boyd Ferrin 801-594-8700
    Bathroom Exhaust Ceiling Fans Panasonic Home Products Farrel B. Beddome 415-459-7000
    Ground Source Heat Pump System Sound Geothermal Corporation Cary Smith 801-942-6100
    Pumps TMS Paul Burt  
    Home Automation System Vantage Paxton Oborn  801-229-2800